14th Jan2005

What now?

by Dutchcloggie

We don’t know. JD might end up an epileptic for the rest of her life with Post Traumatic Epilepsy. Or the knock might simply have exposed a previous condition that leads to having seizures. Or it might be a one-off. They don’t know and they can not tell. That is the most frustrating bit. You just don’t know. It can happen again at any time. Or not at all. And in the mean time you have to adjust your life: don’t lock the door when going to the toilet, in case you have a fit. Always have a phone next to your bed in case of a fit. Always wear a bracelet with instructions for people if you have a fit. No driving for a year. No sport, no more rugby. Take it easy at University…

Take it easy? This is her final year. She wants to go to London for her Masters but that will depend on her grades. Will they be good enough? Or not? How will this impact on her future? I don’t give a rat’s arse about what it means for me although I am already aware that I need to be careful and not smother her by telling her not to do anything.

Taking it easy is not the same as not doing anything at all.
It is important not to treat her like a patient but it will be hard for her.

But it will not stop her playing rugby apparently. If she can no longer play the game, she will be involved on training. Our coach, bless him, has already asked her if she was interested in helping him with training sessions. Good. I would hate for her to loose that too.

I am sad. And worried. For her. She is only 21. I know epilepsy is not a death sentence but it is pretty shit none the less.

12th Jan2005

Home again

by Dutchcloggie

JD is home again. Thank goodness. After playing her secretary all day, it is nice that she can answer her own phonecalls again. I must have updated about 7 people throughout the day yesterday. Felt like one of them flashy PAs, on my mobile all the time.

Anyway….JD suffered a blow to the head at rugby on Sunday and that is where the seizure came from. Unlikely to happen again but she needs to take meds to prevent further seizures for a month. And it is likely she will have to surrender her driving license for a year. Bummer.

Poor JD She feels like she has a bad hangover (and a little drunk). But I am so happy she is OK. I was terrified when it happened but now I know what to do if it ever happens again: let her finish her seizure, then let her sleep it off and inform the GP in the morning. Only when seizures last longer than about 2 minutes should you call 999.

So far this year has not brought me lots of good things. Time for something nice. Like a win in the lottery. Means I have to buy a ticket first though and with the run of luck we have had so far…..

11th Jan2005

Scariest moment of my life

by Dutchcloggie

J. is in hospital. Recovering from a seizure. A proper foaming-at-the-mouth, biting your tongue, completely out of it seizure. Just like that. Out of the blue. Never had one before. And I did not know what to do. So I panicked. I was so scared. I called 999 and as I got a woman on the line, I was trying to get to J. Talking to her, screaming at her. And trying to listen to the lady on the phone.

JD in A&E in Warwick Hospital

JD was fine once she got to hospital

We went to bed last night and J. curled up to me. Nice warm spooning. But 10 minutes later she started to shake and convulse. I was totally freaked and in panic. I have seen ‘epileptic fits’ before but J. has no history of them so I was caught completely unaware. And it happened in her sleep which was scary too. She was foaming at the mouth and when she bit her tongue, she started bleeding. All I could scream at the operator on the phone was that my girlfriend was having a fit and was now bleeding. I did not realise yet that she had just bitten her tongue.

After about 70 seconds which seemed like an eternity, the convulsions stopped and she immediately fell asleep. But I did not know what happened so I was afraid she was going to lapse in some kind of coma. (Hey, what do I know about these things?????) So I kept talking to her and kept her awake until the paramedics arrived. They gave her oxygen and then she slowly came ’round. She woke up and was a bit shaky but quite cheerful.

Waiting for the doctor

It was actually kind of funny in a strange way. As far as she was concerned, she had gone to sleep and was suddenly woken up with an oxygen mask on her face and 2 paramedics in her bedroom!!! Her face was full of confusion and I felt so much love when she looked up at me for an explanation.

They took her to the hospital where they checked her out. She told them she got a knock on the head in last Sunday’s rugby match and that maybe could have caused a concussion that had gone unnoticed. They decided to keep her in for observation and I was sent home after she was admitted to the ward. They will do a CT scan later today.

Sleepy Jane

She is sleeping in the picture above by the way. She is all right now as far as we can see. Hopefully the CT scan will show that it is indeed concussion. If not, she will have to be tested for epilepsy.

I was so scared. Seeing the one you love foaming, bleeding, convulsing in your bed and see the eyes rolling.

Oh and by the way: anyone who says the NHS is not working is lying. At least the one in the hospital here in Warwick is working just fine for me.